Medical, Ramesh Sachdeva

AAP Urges Retesting for Lead Poisoning

Lead Poisoning pic
Lead Poisoning
Image: aap.org

A physician and healthcare executive with more than three decades of experience, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva has served in a variety of roles throughout his career, including clinician, administrator, educator, and researcher. In his current role, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva serves as the associate director of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), a position he has held for five years.

Upon guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the American Academy of Pediatrics strongly advises parents of children under the age of six years who have previously received a blood test to check for lead poisoning to follow up with their physicians to see if an updated test is warranted. According to the CDC and AAP, previously tested children with levels of up to 10 micrograms for each deciliter should receive another test, as it has been found that previous testing methods may be an unreliable when determining whether or not a child is suffering from lead poisoning.

The AAP stresses the importance of these tests given the serious health complications that can develop in children who experience prolonged exposure to lead-based materials. If a child is found to have an elevated amount of lead in their blood, the most common treatment is to move them out of the living situation or other places that are contributing to the problem.

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Medical, Ramesh Sachdeva

NICUs Should Have Adequate Disaster Plans

Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva
Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva

A medical school graduate of the Armed Forces Medical College in Pune, India, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva is an accomplished academic, holding numerous degrees including an MBA from the University of Houston, a PhD in epidemiology from the University of Texas, and a JD from Marquette University. In his current role, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva serves as the executive director of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

In a recent report found in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), researchers studied methods for preparing neonatal intensive care units (NICU) for potential disasters. Because patients in these facilities are particularly dependent on fully functioning equipment at all times, the study authors felt it prudent to examine the disaster procedures in place in most hospitals.

The AAP already has guidelines in place for such occurrences, and this report adds additional recommendations. Response plans for natural disasters that involve in-house actions, as well as coordination with local and regional authorities, should be in place and practiced regularly. The report also lays out guidelines for the adequate staffing of NICU personnel, how to manage technology, and for providing assistance to the infant’s family.

Children, Ramesh Sachdeva

Study Researches Relationship Between Fruit Juice and Weight Gain

 

Fruit Juice pic
Fruit Juice
Image: healthychildren.org

Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva brings more than three decades of experience as a physician and public health executive to his current role as associate executive director of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. In his time with the AAP, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva has been responsible for the creation of a number of new divisions within the organization.

A recent report published in the American Academy of Pediatrics’ journal Pediatrics examined the relationship between 100 percent fruit juice consumption and weight gain in children. Researchers compared data collected from more than 34,000 children across eight different studies in order to determine if 100 percent fruit juice consumption led to weight gain in the age 1-18 population.

Researchers found that children six years of age and younger did gain a small amount of weight when they consumed a single serving of 100 percent juice daily, but the weight gain was negligible. Older children age 7-18 experienced no significant weight gain when consuming a single serving each day.

In light of this research, AAP continues to recommend that children six years of age and under only consume 4-5 ounces of 100 percent fruit juice per day. For the population age 7-18, the limit increases to 8-12 ounces each day.

Medical, Ramesh Sachdeva

The Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics

Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics pic
Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics
Image: amazon.com

Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva, the associate executive director of the American Academy of Pediatrics, is a highly educated medical administrator. He completed medical school at the Armed Forces Medical College in Pune, India, and he also holds a master of science in biostatistics from the Medical College of Wisconsin, an MBA from the University of Houston, a juris doctor from Marquette University, a doctor of epidemiology from the University of Texas, and a doctor of business administration from the University of Strathclyde. Drawing on his considerable knowledge and skill, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva wrote the second chapter of the 2014 edition of the Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics.

In addition to Dr. Sachdeva’s chapter, “Quality and Safety in Healthcare for Children,” the Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics contains valuable information on topics ranging from child and adolescent psychology to childhood metabolic diseases and general nutrition. This handy reference book is designed to help physicians quickly and easily identify clinical conditions and relevant treatments.

The Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics has provided pediatric care solutions to physicians for more than 75 years. Elsevier Publishing released the most recent edition of this trusted resource as a two-volume set in 2015. Together, these volumes contain nearly 4,000 pages of essential information. The latest edition of the Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics also comes with access to a wealth of exclusive content on the Internet.

Medical, Ramesh Sachdeva

Awareness and Access to Care for Children and Youth with Epilepsy

 

Awareness and Access to Care for Children and Youth with Epilepsy  pic
Awareness and Access to Care for Children and Youth with Epilepsy
Image: nichq.org

An experienced public health professional and senior medical administrator, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva functions as the associate executive director of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) in Elk Grove Village, Illinois. As part of his work with the AAP, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva has served as the project director and a principal investigator for the Awareness and Access to Care for Children and Youth with Epilepsy project.

Conducted in partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation, the Awareness and Access to Care for Children and Youth with Epilepsy project was undertaken with financial support from the Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration. From 2004 to 2008, the project worked to improve access to comprehensive and coordinated pediatric epilepsy health care services in underserved areas of California, Illinois, Mississippi, New Jersey, Oregon, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and the District of Columbia.

Part of the project’s mission was to apply the advancements of the adult epilepsy Project ECHO within the pediatric setting. Short for Extension for Community Healthcare Outcomes, ECHO was developed to treat chronic and complex cases of epilepsy in various rural and underserved populations of New Mexico.

Medical, Ramesh Sachdeva

About the SCCM-Weil Research Trust – Society of Critical Care Medicine

SCCM-Weil Research Trust pic
SCCM-Weil Research Trust
Image: sccm.org

A professor of pediatrics at the Medical College of Wisconsin and associate executive director of the American Academy of Pediatrics, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva also serves as the medical director of quality initiatives and the director of subspecialty pediatrics with the Academy. An active member in his professional field, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva belongs to several medical organizations, including the Society of Critical Care Medicine (SCCM).

Open to professionals who provide care to injured and critically ill patients, the Society of Critical Care Medicine is dedicated to promoting the highest quality care in the field of intensive care. To ensure patients receive the best care possible, the society offers fundamental courses so health care institutions can evaluate and improve the skills of their clinicians, fellows, residents, and students. As an additional resource for intensive care units, the SCCM sponsors the SCCM-Weil Research Trust.

An extension of the preexisting SCCM-Weil Research Grant program, the trust funds research grants awarded by the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Named for the society’s founder, the SCCM-Weil Research Trust is awarded each year at its Critical Care Congress. Grant applicants must be current SCCM members in good standing and may designate a SCCM mentor if the applicant is within 10 years of his or her training completion date.

Successful applications are judged for their approach, significance, innovation, institutional support, and overall experience. Funding grants may be as much as $50,000, and indirect budget costs may not exceed 10 percent of the grant total.

Ramesh Sachdeva

Common Sleep-Disordered Breathing Syndromes

obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome
obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome

 

Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva lectures on pediatric critical care and sleep medicine as a practicing faculty physician. Throughout his career, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva has accumulated research experience and supervised the implementation of research studies. Among the subjects he has investigated is sleep-disordered breathing.

Sleep-disordered breathing comprises different aspects of breathing abnormalities. One of these is obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome, or OSAHS. This condition happens when there is partial or complete obstruction of the airways. Common symptoms of OSAHS include daytime somnolence and nocturnal choking.

Another aspect of sleep-disordered breathing is upper airway resistance syndrome (UARS). A patient with this condition experiences excessive and significant airway resistance and esophageal inspiratory pressure. UARS shares some symptoms with OSAHS, such as daytime sleepiness.

Treatment of these sleep-disordered breathing syndromes include CPAP, or continuous positive airway pressure, oral appliances, as well as lifestyle changes for weight loss. Surgery is sometimes undertaken when other treatments fail to improve a patient’s condition.