Health Care, Ramesh Sachdeva

What Is the Dyad Model?

A respected presence in the field of pediatrics, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva serves as the senior vice president and chief clinical officer at Florida’s Nicklaus Children’s Health System. As part of his responsibilities, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva works closely with the president of the hospital using the Dyad model to ensure efficiency in operations.

The Dyad model is an organizational structure whereby both clinical and non-clinical hospital personnel work together under a defined system of cooperation designed to help medical institutions achieve their goals. The Dyad model has its origins dating back to 1908 at the Mayo Clinic when Dr. William Mayo, a physician, appointed Harry Harwick, an administrator, to assist him in managing business operations and creating a suitable environment for business expansion.

In today’s fast-changing healthcare sector, the Dyad leadership structure creates an enabling environment for partnerships among various departments. Under this structure, clinical leaders with medical expertise work together with their non-clinical colleagues with expertise in operations, human resources, and finance to complement each other and ensure every facet of a hospital’s operations is well-managed.

Health Care, Medical

The Dyad Model of Leadership in Healthcare

Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva leverages his nearly three decades of experience working in pediatric medicine to inform his work as senior vice president and chief clinical officer for Nicklaus Children’s Health System. Overseeing all hospital operations, Dr. Ramesh Sachdeva works in tandem with the president of the organization in what is called a dyad model of leadership.

A popular leadership strategy in the healthcare field, the dyad model pairs up both clinicians and non-clinicians (in a hospital setting, usually administrators) to take advantage of both skillsets. For hospitals and other healthcare situations, complex challenges are a daily struggle. Leadership methods that take advantage of different perspectives to arrive at a useful model for all involved are usually viewed with approval.

For most healthcare systems adopting a dyad model, a respected leader from among the physicians is paired to work in a close partnership with an administrator that has a history of success. In some situations, these dyad models exist down the leadership chain, going from the very top of the hospital down to lower levels as well. Communication is key for this setup to work; partners must be able to respect different viewpoints and acknowledge differences in skills and background for the partnerships to be effective.